Film Review – Storks


film-review-storksDIRECTED BY: Nicholas Stoller and Doug Sweetland

STARRING: Andy Samberg, Katie Crown, Kelsey Grammer, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele, Anton Starkman, Jennifer Aniston, Ty Burrell, Stephen Kramer Glickman, Awkwafina and Danny Trejo

 

SYNOPSIS

Storks have moved on from delivering babies to packages. But when an order for a baby appears, the best delivery stork must scramble to fix the error by delivering the baby.

film-review-storksStorks is an animated film that focuses on life for Storks after years of delivering babies. Now Storks deliver packages for global giant Cornerstore.com. We follow the company’s top deliver Stork, Junior, who is about to be promoted when the only human on Stork Mountain, Tulip, accidentally activates the Baby Making Machine, producing an adorable and unauthorised baby girl. Junior and Tulip race against the clock to deliver their first-ever baby drop before the boss gets wise.

film-review-storksFollowing their big hit The LEGO Movie, the Warner Bros. Animation team come out with Storks, a film revolving around Storks now living in an age of delivering packages for a global internet chain rather than delivering babies. When the Baby Making Machine at Stork Mountain is accidentally put back into use, we follow stork Junior and human Tulip trying to deliver a baby without anyone back at Stork Mountain catch on to what they’ve done.

 

Storks is just as chaotic as what the WB Animation team have done before, with the attempted jokes and slapstick humour coming thick and fast during the films ninety minute runtime that had more hits than misses for me. There’s a particular sequence that leads to an attempted silence battle as both sides try to keep screams of pain to a minimum in order to not wake up the baby that I just ate up. The animation style is great and particularly in the final act is gorgeously stylised in creativity and colour. The films key strength comes in the voice acting from its leads, Andy Samberg and Katie Crown, as the two have terrific chemistry and their deliveries on certain lines worked to get the laughs from the audience at my screening. On the supporting side of things, the scene stealers are the wolves voiced by Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele. Literally anything involving them and the wolf pack had me in stitches. I’m still confused as to why they randomly turn up at a certain moment towards the end of the film though. The human sub-plot of the Gardner family went with an idea that I appreciated the film attempted to tackle, which has the young boy write the letter for a sibling in the first place due to being fed up with his parents spending too much time working rather than him.

 

While there is laughs to be found with Storks there is some comedy bits that fall flat, but the jokes come that quick and fast that the film picks up the slack as it speeds along. I can honestly say that Pigeon Toady joins Sausage Party’s Douche as the most irritating animated character of the year, he absolutely did not work for me in terms of comedy at all personally. While Kelsey Grammer gets a good few lines in, his character Hunter is pretty much one-note and also there’s not enough of Danny Trejo’s Jasper character for me to even have an ounce of care for him. The story of the film itself is pretty much by the numbers and relies on the humour to carry the film, which thankfully it does after a slow opening act.

 

VERDICT

I’ll admit, the film does fall into the section that I might forget about it a few years down the line due to how by the numbers it is, but the animation is very well done, the voice acting from Samberg and Crown work tremendously well together and Key and Peele’s wolves provide the big laughs for Storks. After a weak opening, the film thankfully gets stronger as it goes on and goes out on a sweet note. Sometimes you just need a bit of fluff cinema and that’s okay.  6/10

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